fanufactured:

angrybabes:

swanjolras:

thebrokenhunterandhisbrokenangel:

worldofdrakan:

its-heaven-nowadays:

More Macklemore, less Robin Thicke.

And yet a huge percentage of Tumblr hates him. Not trying to be confrontational, but could someone please explain to me why this is?

Because he is a straight white guy and Tumblr isn’t always right. 

oh my god if i have to see this post on my dashboard one more time
all right, okay. let’s talk.
last year on a slow day in law/society class, my teacher showed us a movie where charlize theron was one of the only female workers in a mine in minnesota. she experienced a fuckload of sexual harassment, ofc; it was when she started daring to complain about the sexual harassment that shit got really bad.
i remember watching charlize theron go through all these awful things, and i remember getting vaguely invested in her as a heroine; yeah, you go charlize theron, you continue to work despite these harassment and assaults, you stand up for yourself when people shun you in the community, etc
and there was this climactic scene where the miners’ union was having a meeting, and charlize theron was going up to complain about something or tell people she was suing the company or smth, i can’t remember, and she stood there in front of this huge crowd of angry men who were booing her and catcalling her and shouting the worst things at her and she’s getting really miserable
and then her father, who also works at the mine, goes up and says “hey, you’re all jerks, think of your mothers & daughters, would you treat them this way,” and the miners are like “oh wow charlize theron totally does deserve our support etc” and then the movie continues
but all i could think was— what, so they’ll listen to a man but not to the woman who’s actually affected? why doesn’t charlize theron get to save the day and be the hero? in a conversation about sexism, why is his voice more important than hers?
we’re not mad at macklemore. or— well, we are mad at macklemore, but we’re more mad at the system that prioritizes macklemore over actual queer rappers, over actual rappers of color, who have been saying exactly the same shit for decades and been ignored.
we’re mad at the system that gives more attention to straight allies than queer activists.
we’re mad at the system that only supports queer rights when they are quiet and polite and have cute graphics.
we’re mad at the system that makes macklemore a hero of of the queer struggle but doesn’t know marsha p. johnson’s name.
we’re mad at the system that will listen to macklemore when he comes to defend us— but won’t listen to us.
we’re mad at the system that has constructed itself to make damn certain that only straight cis white boys can be heroes.
it’s fuckin’ great that macklemore thought he was gay in third grade. but the system would rather give his third grade gay freakout the spotlight than our actual whole-life queer experiences— and that’s not okay.

THISSSS.

Always reblog.

fanufactured:

angrybabes:

swanjolras:

thebrokenhunterandhisbrokenangel:

worldofdrakan:

its-heaven-nowadays:

More Macklemore, less Robin Thicke.

And yet a huge percentage of Tumblr hates him. Not trying to be confrontational, but could someone please explain to me why this is?

Because he is a straight white guy and Tumblr isn’t always right. 

oh my god if i have to see this post on my dashboard one more time

all right, okay. let’s talk.

last year on a slow day in law/society class, my teacher showed us a movie where charlize theron was one of the only female workers in a mine in minnesota. she experienced a fuckload of sexual harassment, ofc; it was when she started daring to complain about the sexual harassment that shit got really bad.

i remember watching charlize theron go through all these awful things, and i remember getting vaguely invested in her as a heroine; yeah, you go charlize theron, you continue to work despite these harassment and assaults, you stand up for yourself when people shun you in the community, etc

and there was this climactic scene where the miners’ union was having a meeting, and charlize theron was going up to complain about something or tell people she was suing the company or smth, i can’t remember, and she stood there in front of this huge crowd of angry men who were booing her and catcalling her and shouting the worst things at her and she’s getting really miserable

and then her father, who also works at the mine, goes up and says “hey, you’re all jerks, think of your mothers & daughters, would you treat them this way,” and the miners are like “oh wow charlize theron totally does deserve our support etc” and then the movie continues

but all i could think was— what, so they’ll listen to a man but not to the woman who’s actually affected? why doesn’t charlize theron get to save the day and be the hero? in a conversation about sexism, why is his voice more important than hers?

we’re not mad at macklemore. or— well, we are mad at macklemore, but we’re more mad at the system that prioritizes macklemore over actual queer rappers, over actual rappers of color, who have been saying exactly the same shit for decades and been ignored.

we’re mad at the system that gives more attention to straight allies than queer activists.

we’re mad at the system that only supports queer rights when they are quiet and polite and have cute graphics.

we’re mad at the system that makes macklemore a hero of of the queer struggle but doesn’t know marsha p. johnson’s name.

we’re mad at the system that will listen to macklemore when he comes to defend us— but won’t listen to us.

we’re mad at the system that has constructed itself to make damn certain that only straight cis white boys can be heroes.

it’s fuckin’ great that macklemore thought he was gay in third grade. but the system would rather give his third grade gay freakout the spotlight than our actual whole-life queer experiences— and that’s not okay.

THISSSS.

Always reblog.

fandomsandfeminism:

dietodayinc:

why say “i need feminism”

why not say “we need equality”

i feel like the former isn’t the right way to say it

Because they aren’t the same thing?

Equality is an end goal.

Feminism is a means. 

(Source: k9kelsey, via metis-problems)

Anonymous asked: Just out of curiosity- you responded to a recent ask about anthropology and said that it still upholds white supremacy. Why do you feel that way? I'm a current phD student studying anth, and although the discipline has a long history of racism, I feel it's come a long way in the past couple decades, and with a lot of self-reflection and self-criticism, I think it's maybe begun to turn a corner. I struggle a lot with the concern that it's still racist, and I'd really value your thoughts on it.

thisisnotjapan:

I think so too, but to pretend that abuse by anthropologists of indigenous peoples doesn’t occur anymore you’re lying to yourself and not helping those that are still getting taken advantage of and viewed like specimens of study. Anthropology, like sociology, is still dominated by white men that influence the curriculum and view people as “subjects of study” rather than people. To be honest, I have seen first hand many people who study anthropology and view themselves as progressive still treat the people they’re studying as objects.

They might understand racism and oppression in a topical, academic sense and they might see the injustice of it but there’s a lack of empathy. That’s a scary thing to see. Most of the time that is a mind frame they will have for a long time, maybe their whole life, because they are aware of these issues but are emotionally detached from them. Apathy is still an issue generated by the way these issues are approached in academia. There is still dehumanization going on, or if not that there is no process of humanizing the dehumanized in the discourse, so that you end up with people who are well educated in these cultures and the institutional problems they face but cannot bring themselves to be much more than “fascinated”. 

grouchomac:

If what you are about to say feels familiar, ready-made on your tongue; if your fingers type out of rote, habit, and expectations; if your thoughts seem practiced – stop and consider. Enjoy white space and silence.

"I’m doing less personal writing now than I used to for a very simple obvious reason. You use up your childhood, unless you’re able, like William Maxwell, to keep going back and finding wonderful new levels in it. The deep, personal material of the latter half of your life is your children. You can write about your parents when they’re gone, but your children are still going to be here, and you’re going to want them to come and visit you in the nursing home. Maybe it’s advisable to move on to writing those stories that are more observation."

Interview with Alice Munro (The Paris Review: The Art of Fiction, No. 137). (via the-library-and-step-on-it)

hayleystarkftw:

As the market for prostitution expands, so does the illegal sector. In New Zealand, where the enitre industry has been legalised - the illegal sector has actually expanded more than the legal sector. The illegal sector now makes up 80% of the industry (Instone and Margerison 2007). “

keep telling me how New Zealand has the perfect model. 

(via metis-problems)

(Source: hiphopisthefuture)

This may be my new favourite quote. Either way, it’s certainly my favourite illustration of it.

This may be my new favourite quote. Either way, it’s certainly my favourite illustration of it.

(Source: hiphopisthefuture)

"Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in."

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (via ichbindeinesylvia)

(via fandomsandfeminism)

Dear world,
You do not understand and cannot comprehend how much I love rubyetc’s art. It keeps me going, even when I don’t think I can anymore.

Dear world,

You do not understand and cannot comprehend how much I love rubyetc’s art. It keeps me going, even when I don’t think I can anymore.

(Source: rubyetc, via rubyetc)

"Since birth,
I have been
defined
by numbers:
inches,
feet,
pounds,
grades,
percentages.
Does it ever
stop?"

Michelle K., Numbers.   (via devpatels)

(via fuckyeahtxtposts)


boom

boom

(Source: reverseracism, via fanufactured)

(via rubyetc)

timeshaiku:

A haiku from the article: The Lies That Doctors and Patients Tell

timeshaiku:

A haiku from the article: The Lies That Doctors and Patients Tell